Shenkin Street: one of Tel Aviv’s coolest streets to stroll down

Shenkin StreetShenkin Street is one of the most famous, happening streets in Tel Aviv. Considered to be a local attraction for over 20 years, the renovations through 2012 that have converted the street into a pedestrian paradise, have rejuvenated a street that really does epitomize the Tel Aviv spirit. And with it’s proximity to some of Tel Aviv’s other must-sees, such as Carmel Market and Nachalat Binyamin, you really should squeeze in a visit to this part of town.

In its past many of the city’s most inspirational alternative music and theater and dance groups emerged from Shenkin Street, primarily during the 1980s. Today things are a bit more mainstream but it remains a popular location with its many cafes and funky little stores keeping this area alive.

What NOT to miss if you’re in a shopping mood

There is plenty to do on Shenkin Street. As the location of many of Israel’s coolest designers the area is a shopping paradise with a broad range of wares from clothes to gifts to choose from. For designer clothes you can’t go wrong with Ronen Chen (49 Shenkin Street) and Naama Bezalel and Banot – Luli Liam (40 Shenkin Street). New on the street is Carmen Miranda (22 Shenkin Street), a collection of Brazilian fashion (we’re talking bikinis, shoes, jewelry, clothes, beach towels, etc) – worth checking out.

If you are after some interesting jewelry pieces, designer Michal Negrin (37 Shenkin Street) will be able to assist. There are a plethora of shoe shops to browse, but Daniella Lehavi (35 Shenkin Street) is famed for her shoes and leather bags. Music lovers should certainly check out trendy music shop Krembo (18 Shenkin Street).

Other popular shops on the street include Luchy (13 Shenkin Street), a cute shop which offers simple items at a very affordable price, great for those on a budget. Elite is another option offering great items in a pleasant setting. If second-hand bargains are a favorite, head to Shtaim (Two) (38 Shenkin Street). Dig around in this renowned second hand store and you may be delightfully surprised with what you find. You could also take a trip to Asia by stepping through the door of The Third Eye. Located on 7 Shenkin Street you can browse and purchase clothes that have been imported from India, Thailand and other Asian countries, giving you the chance to find something just a little unique. One last shop to recommend is Uri Kling who is located near the Rothschild Street end. He has some amazing jewelry and small furniture pieces to browse.**

The street also has a tiny park situated half way down, which is a nice place to stop and people watch. But if you are seeking refreshments during your shopping break, there is no better place than Café Tamar. This Tel Aviv landmark at 57 Shenkin Street has been serving coffee to an eclectic mix of customers ranging from Israel’s top politicians, journalists and artists alike for over 40 years. Another healthy option is to grab a juice at one of the colorful juice stands in the street.

If you are looking for more sustenance than coffee and pastries or juice, we’d recommend you visit Orna and Ella (one of our ten awesome Tel Aviv restaurants). A firm favorite and by far the best restaurant in the area, this is the nicest spot to grab a bite to eat.

Given the popularity of this area, you should avoid visiting on Fridays when things generally get very crowded. If crowds and buzz are your thing, there is no better time than a Friday to put yourself in the midst of Shenkin Street’s bustling sidewalks while grabbing some shopping and then jostling for a lunchtime spot. If you’d rather have the street a little more to yourself, try any other day.

Shenkin Street, a Tel Aviv street well worth a stroll down. And here’s a great little clip to give you a taste of life on the Street…

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** Note that by the time you visit, some of these stores may no longer be alive and kicking, as many stores come and go…

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